Walking, Riding and Access to Public Transport:
supporting active travel in Australian communities
 

Federal policy statement on active transport, with actions for Australian governments to better meet national targets for road safety, physical activity and public health, disability access and carbon emissions.

 

The active transport policy was based on four key pillars:

 

PLAN

Plan and integrate walking and riding facilities when planning for land use and transport

 

BUILD

Build appropriate infrastructure for walking and riding needs

 

ENCOURAGE

Encourage greater participation in walking, cycling and public transport

 

GOVERN

Manage and coordinate across agencies and levels of government, and work with communities and organisations.

 

DOWNLOAD: Walking, Riding and Access to Public Transport - final policy paper 2013 (pdf)

 

Economic Benefits of Walking
Economic benefits of walking, per kilometre, for a typical walking infrastructure project
Economic Benefits of Cycling
Economic benefits of cycling, per kilometre, for a typical cycling infrastructure project
Urban Road Heirarchy
A potential urban road hierarchy, for a range of different types of roads in a city environment
Bullcreek Syndrome
This case study has infamously been dubbed 'Bullcreek Syndrome'.
Link vs Place
Every street is both a transport link and a place for people
PT catchment
A simple link for walking and cycling can increase access to a public transport hub.
Plan Build Encourage Manage
The four key principles to improving walking, riding and access to public transport
Barriers and Opportunities
The key barriers, and opportunities, to improving walking and cycling access
Expand
Facts + figures on walking, riding and accessing public transport
 

The diagrams below are extracted from the policy paper, Australian Government (2013) Walking, Riding and Access to Public Transport: supporting active travel in Australian communities (click to expand).

 
Walking, Riding and Access to Public Transport:
discussion paper

 

This discussion paper was released by the Australian Government's Department of Infrastructure and Transport in October 2012. The discussion paper included options to increase the mode share of walking, riding and public transport.

 

The discussion paper was part of an extensive engagement process with all three levels of government, industry and professional organisations, academics and community representatives. 

 

Nearly 200 submissions were made. Following the feedback and engagement process, the final policy paper was released by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Department of Infrastructure and Transport in July 2013. 

 

DOWNLOAD: Walking, Riding and Access to Public Transport- discussion paper 2012 (pdf)

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PT catchment

A simple link for walking and cycling can increase access to a public transport hub.